Driving A Dog Sled In Mont-Tremblant

In the intro to my Old Faithful post a couple of weeks ago, I revealed I was snowmobiling in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, at the time. As it turned out, snowmobiling was just one of the modes of transport we got to experience while we were there…

IMG_2180We also got to travel by gondola (the aerial kind, not the boat)…

IMG_2206We went snowshoeing, to get a bit of exercise…

IMG_2154But by far the most fun form of transportation we got to experience was dog sledding!

Our morning with Alaskan Adventure (located just outside Arundel, QC) started with introductions, as we escorted the dogs out to their sleds. Their welcome was so genuine and full of energy, it was clear they couldn’t wait to be off!

Rich getting a cuddle (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Rich getting a cuddle (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Sue getting a kiss (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Sue getting a kiss (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Then came the biggest surprise of the day… we weren’t just riding in the sleighs, we were going to get to drive them ourselves! (Well, the human members of our party were, Gravee and I are a little too small for that sort of thing!)

Although our fantastic guides gave constant instructions and advice, we were on our own aboard the sled. It was an incredible experience to barrel through the falling snow, just us and the dogs enthusiastically pulling us.

Look at that concentration! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Look at that concentration! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

This is so much fun! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

This is so much fun! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Heading up the hill (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Heading up the hill (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Like something from a Jack London novel (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Like something from a Jack London novel (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Looks like Rich does this every day, doesn't it?! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Looks like Rich does this every day, doesn’t it?! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

I can only imagine how much more fun it must have been for Rich and Sue, as they took turns controlling the sled, encouraging our lead dogs with cries of, “Allez up-up-up, Bella! Good dog, Boum-Boum!”

Sue's turn! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

Sue’s turn! (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

I got this (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

I got this (photo by Alaskan Adventure)

My view of the adventure

My view of the adventure

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At the end of the run, we got to thank our pups with treats, before showering them with tummy rubs in their living compound.

Thanking Boum-Boum and Bella

Thanking Boum-Boum and Bella

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Treat time for Winona and Toundra

Treat time for Winona and Toundra

As I understand, most dog sledding operations are a little nervous about letting guests interact with their dogs, for fear of an incident. But Annette, Sonia and Maxim positively encouraged us to get close to their dogs, many of whom are rescues. This unexpected intimacy made the experience all the more memorable.

Sue giving Patches some love

Sue giving Patches some love

Jeff and Kathleen with Nemo, one of Alaskan Adventures current litter of puppies

Jeff and Kathleen with Nemo, one of Alaskan Adventures current litter of puppies

Mallory's a bit shy

Mallory’s a bit shy

Unalaq isn't!

Unalaq isn’t!

And Wakiza wants to dance

And Wakiza wants to dance

A big thank you to all at Alaskan Adventure for a wonderful morning, especially our canine companions: Puce & Nayak, Winona & Toundra, and our lead dogs, Bella & Boum-Boum.

IMG_6072This post was inspired by this week’s Cee’s Which Way Challenge.

If driving your own dog sled team sounds like fun, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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Riding the Niagara Rapids in a Jetboat

“This will not keep you dry. Nothing will keep you dry!”

This was the pep talk we received from the crew as they handed out heavy, yellow rain ponchos prior to the first time I rode the Niagara Rapids. And boy were they right!

I love everything to do with the Environment. And the Whirlpool Jetboat Tour on the Niagara River will get you closer to nature that you ever thought possible!

From Niagara-on-the-Lake, on the shores of Lake Ontario, our flat-bottomed jetboat crawled south along the Niagara River. Until it passed out of the no-wake zone, whereupon the captain released all 1500 horsepower. We blasted towards the entrance of the Niagara Gorge, pausing only to do a couple of Hamilton Turns along the way to start the adrenalin flowing. And from that moment the buzz just built and built!

I could give you all sorts of facts and figures about the boats, the Niagara River, or the Devil’s Hole Class 5 rapids in which the jetboats play. But, as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words:

Before: You can see Rich & Sue, plus our friends Mick and Chris, sitting in the front row

Before: You can see Rich & Sue, plus our friends Mick and Chris, sitting in the front row

After: I can tell you, that takes your breath away, in more ways than one!

After: I can tell you, that takes your breath away, in more ways than one!

As the second photo shows, you basically get the whole Niagara River landing in your lap!

What! A! Rush!

So much so, one ride isn’t enough. Since that first time, I’ve been back again:

Before: Again in the front row, but this time we conned Rich's Dad into coming along

Before: Again in the front row, but this time we conned Rich’s Dad into coming along

After: Where'd we go?!

After: Where’d we go?!

And again:

Before: Again we scored the front row, the best seat in the house, this time with the Geddas who were visiting us from Sweden

Before: Again we scored the front row, the best seat in the house, this time with the Geddas who were visiting us from Sweden

During: Who needs air?

During: Who needs air?

After: They were right about nothing keeping you dry!

After: They were right about nothing keeping you dry!

And… No, that’s it for now. Sadly, I’ve only done it three times so far. But I feel a return trip coming on this summer.

And what’s the reward for such adventures?…

Sue with the Geddas,... Soggy but very happy.

Sue with the Geddas,… Soggy but very happy.

Total Saturation! And it feels great!!

This post was inspired by the photo themes Saturation (from Nancy, of Nancy Merrill Photography), Environment (from Ailsa of Where’s My Backpack?) and Reward (from Krista of the Daily Post).

If being submerged by a Class 5 rapids sounds like fun to you, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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On The Trail Of The Klondike Gold Rush By Train & Bike

In 1898, prospectors of the Klondike Gold Rush toiled their way up Alaska’s Coastal Mountains and into the Yukon, in the hopes of striking it rich. Most saw their dreams evaporate, and many never even returned home.

Over a hundred years later, I (sort of) followed in their footsteps, ascending the White Pass, one of the two passes miners had to chose between (the other being the Chilkoot Pass) at that start of their journey to the Klondike, some 800 miles distant.

White Pass

White Pass

Back during the Gold Rush, in addition to their equipment, the Canadian government insisted that all prospectors take at least a year’s food supply with them, which together weighed roughly a ton. Most miners had to ferry this all the way to the Yukon on their own, making several trips up and down the daunting passes, often battling awful weather and criminals along the way.

In an attempt to improve the situation, between 1898 and 1900, the White Pass and Yukon Route narrow gauge railroad was constructed from Skagway on the Alaskan coast, up  White Pass, and on to Whitehorse in the Yukon. Part of this route still runs today as a heritage railway, and during my time in Alaska a few years back, I got to ride the first stretch, up the pass from Skagway and across the border into Canada.

The White Pass and Yukon Route narrow gauge railroad winds its precarious way up towards Canada

The White Pass and Yukon Route narrow gauge railroad winds its precarious way up towards Canada

The track clung to the sides of the mountains, often veering away into side valleys, before heading back to the main pass. Along the way, the engines tugged the train through endless fog, rain, two tunnels and across several precarious-looking trestles up to White Pass Summit, 2865 feet above our starting point in Skagway.

Out train about to enter the aptly-named Tunnel Mountain

Our train about to enter the aptly-named Tunnel Mountain

Glad we no longer use this trestle!

Glad we no longer use this trestle!

The bleak summit of White Pass

The bleak summit of White Pass

While other passengers continued on to Bennett or Carcross, Fraser Meadows marked the end of the line for us. There we exchanged our comfortable, warm, and above all dry carriage for an altogether more exposed form of transportation.

In this weather? Really?

In this weather? Really?

To be honest, given the weather, I more than half expected our Sockeye Cycle Co. guide to tell us our 15 mile bike ride back to Skagway had been cancelled. But as he put it, if they called it off every time it rained, the excursion would never run!

The start of our bike ride

The start of our bike ride… not very inviting!

I can’t tell you how glad I am it did go ahead. It was exhilarating to freewheel down this infamous pass along the South Klondike Highway. It remains the one and only time I’ve ever crossed an international border on a bicycle to date.

The South Klondike Highway, as seen across White Pass from the train earlier

The South Klondike Highway, as seen across White Pass from the train earlier

The long and winding road

The long and winding road

A train on the way back down to Skagway

A train on the way back down to Skagway

Rich & Sue at the Bridal Veil Falls (Oh, and since the rain gear isn't just for show, so I'm keeping out of sight in a dry pocket!)

Rich & Sue at the Bridal Veil Falls
(Oh, and since the rain gear isn’t just for show, I’m keeping out of sight in a dry pocket!)

I wonder if that's the same one we went up on?

I wonder if that’s the same one we went up on?

Back in a damp Skagway

Back in a damp Skagway

Although I was glad it was Rich doing the peddling the couple of times the road did a short climb, it was a sobering thought to imagine what the miners had had to endure before the highway and railroad were built.

Gold Rush Trail of  '98 marker, barely visible through the fog

Gold Rush Trail of ’98 marker, barely visible through the fog

This post was inspired by this week’s Cee’s Which Way and Fun Foto Challenges, the latter of which is Bikes and Motorcycles this week.

If speeding down a steep, twisting mountain pass in the rain sounds like your idea of fun, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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Old Faithful By Snowmobile

I am so (or make that, ‘snow’) lucky! This week I’m snowmobiling in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, about 80 miles northwest of Montreal. I’m accompanied by Rich & Sue, as always, but we’re also joined by our regular snowmobiling partners, Jeff & Kathleen from Connecticut.

Unsurprisingly, this has got me thinking about previous snowmobiling trips we’ve all made together. In doing so, I realised I’ve never told you about the time I snowmobiled in Yellowstone National Park, and decided this week’s Which Way Challenge was the perfect opportunity to correct that.

To protect Yellowstone’s natural beauty, the US National Park Service have regulated the types of snowmobile allowed into the park for quite a while now. To reduce the amount of traffic, they also require all snowmobilers to be accompanied by a registered guide. So early one morning, we found ourselves following our guides out of the town of West Yellowstone, on a tour organised by Two Top Snowmobiles. We entered Yellowstone National Park almost immediately, and shortly thereafter crossed from Montana into Wyoming.

Our first stop was overlooking the Madison River Valley, before the sun had even crested the mountains in the distance. Despite the early hour, conditions couldn’t have been more perfect.

Sue, Kathleen and Jeff on the trail beside one of their hogs at our first stop

Sue, Kathleen and Jeff on the trail beside one of their hogs at our first stop

Early morning view of the Madison Valley

Early morning view of the Madison Valley

Our ultimate destination was Old Faithful, but our guides stopped regularly, allowing us to turn off our engines, remove our helmets (or at least raise our visors), and enjoy the spectacular peace and beauty of the landscape, not to mention the wildlife. (Of course, being a Ses, I didn’t have a helmet to remove, but that’s beside the point.)

What's Sue spotted?

What’s Sue spotted?

... Oh, our first wildlife of the day

… Oh, our first wildlife of the day

And soon after came our first buffalo sighting

And soon after came our first buffalo sighting

Very exciting!

Very exciting!

More deer beside the Madison River

More deer beside the Madison River

At Madison Junction, we witnessed a whole herd of buffalo!

At Madison Junction, we witnessed a whole herd of buffalo!

IMG_1857

And shortly thereafter saw our first volcanic steams of the day

And shortly thereafter saw our first volcanic steams of the day

IMG_1862IMG_1863At the Fountain Paint Pot Nature Trail, we had a Which Way within a Which Way! There we saw steaming volcanic pools, hissing fumaroles, bubbling mud pits, and our first geyser of the day.

The boardwalk at Fountain Paint Pot Trail

The boardwalk at Fountain Paint Pot Trail

A steaming pool

A steaming pool

IMG_1875

Flies cluster on a rock surrounded by scalding water

Flies cluster on a rock surrounded by scalding water

The Fountain Paint Pot mudpots

The Fountain Paint Pot mudpots

IMG_1881

Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble...

Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble…

Sizzling fumaroles

Sizzling fumaroles

Thar She Blows!  The Clepsydra Geyser perhaps... to be honest I've forgotten which features of the Lower Geyser Basin are captured in the photos above: but if anyone can help me out, I'd be grateful!

Thar She Blows!
The Clepsydra Geyser perhaps… to be honest I’ve forgotten which features of the Lower Geyser Basin are captured in the photos above: but if anyone can help me out, I’d be grateful!

IMG_1899Naturally, Old Faithful was the highlight of the day, and was everything I’d hoped for. After waiting patently for around 20 minutes, a fountain of water, roughly 140 feet tall, erupted into the air. I was pretty impressed, I can tell you!

Me and Rich waiting (semi) patiently for Old Faithful to erupt - notice the sign in the background...

Me and Rich waiting (semi) patiently for Old Faithful to erupt
- notice the sign in the background…

IMG_1908

Clearly this coyote is a bit of a rule-breaker!

Clearly this coyote is a bit of a rule-breaker!

Time for the main event!!!

Time for the main event!!!

IMG_1912IMG_1913

With a bit of time in hand, instead of heading directly back to West Yellowstone, our guides lead us another six or so miles deeper into the park, to the Continental Divide crossing at Craig Pass.

The whole gang at Craig Pass

The whole gang at Craig Pass

Then it was back on our machines for a fun return ride West Yellowstone, with a couple more stops to break up the Journey.

Kepler Cascades

Kepler Cascades

Time for a snack!

Time for a snack!

Firehole Falls

Firehole Falls

IMG_1938This post was inspired by this week’s Cee’s Which Way Challenge.

If snowmobiling through Yellowstone’s winter wonderland is for you, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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Columbia Icefield Glacial Adventure

Over the last couple of Wednesdays I’ve shared some of my exploits on (and above) the Juneau Icefield in Alaska. And with the cold and snow still firmly entrenched here at home, I thought I’d continue the glacial Which Way theme.

In Juneau, I flew over glaciers. I landed on a glacier. And I even hiked on a glacier. What I didn’t do was drive on a glacier. But eight months later I got to do just that, during a visit to the Canadian Rockies in Alberta.

IMG_8953We stayed overnight at the Glacier View Inn, just after crossing into Jasper National Park on Highway 93, the Icefields Parkway. Being on the top floor of the fascinating Icefield Interpretive Centre, our hotel had us perfectly situated for an early Columbia Icefield Glacial Adventure the next morning.

The Glacier View Inn and Icefield Interpretive Centre

The Glacier View Inn and Icefield Interpretive Centre

Misty morning view of the Athabasca Glacier from our (slightly grubby) hotel room window

Misty morning view of the Athabasca Glacier from our (slightly grubby) hotel room window

From the Icefield Centre we were taken by a shuttle to the staging post for the Ice Explorers, which would drive us up onto the Athabasca Glacier. The Ice Explorers are a cross between a coach and an ATV. And these monsters have to be powerful to carry their 56 passengers onto the icefield.

From their staging post on the rugged moraines beside the glacier, they seemingly drop off the edge of the world, down onto the ice itself. From there they power their way roughly 1¼ miles up the Athabasca Glacier to a viewing spot where you can get out of the Ice Explorer.

An Ice Explorer leaving the staging area

An Ice Explorer leaving the staging area

Powering up the Athabasca Glacier

Powering up the Athabasca Glacier

We've got a convoy!

We’ve got a convoy!

Even these massive machines are dwarfed by the landscape

Even these massive machines are dwarfed by the landscape

Of course, this part of the tour was a bit tame for a hardened arctic-adventurer like myself, having hiked on the Juneau Icefield the previous year. But in all seriousness, it was fun to once again stand on solid ice. And the scenery was spellbinding.

IMG_8773IMG_8736IMG_8738At 125 square miles in area, the Columbia Icefield is the largest extent of ice in the Rocky Mountains. It lies across the border between Banff and Jasper National Parks, penned in by the surrounding mountains. The Athabasca is one of eight major glaciers that spill off the icefield and down between these imprisoning peaks.

This is kinda what the Athabasca Glacier looks like from my perspective

This is kinda what the Athabasca Glacier looks like from my perspective

And there I am on the glacier! (with a strange flash-effect)

And there I am on the glacier! (with a strange flash-effect)

See... I really was there with Rich & Sue

See… I really was there with Rich & Sue

IMG_8741IMG_8742After our allotted time on the glacier, we climbed aboard our Ice Explorer and rumbled back to the staging post, and from there on to the Icefield Centre. Following a fun hour or two exploring the Athabasca’s terminal moraines on foot, we continued our Journey towards Jasper. (What a great name that is, by the way, even if the spelling is a little strange!) But that’s a story for another day and another Which Way.

What a cool monster!

What a cool monster!

A couple of the Ice Explorer's ancestors

A couple of the Ice Explorer’s ancestors

In a cool link to my previous post about the Grand Canyon Skyway, since my visit to the Athabasca Glacier a similar attraction has been opened there, called the Glacier Skywalk.

Back the the Icefield Centre: the Athabasca Glacier and its terminal moraines beneath blue skies

Back the the Icefield Centre: the Athabasca Glacier and its terminal moraines beneath blue skies

This post was inspired by this week’s Cee’s Which Way Challenge.

If you enjoyed this tale of mechanical marvels on ice, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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Skywalking above the Grand Canyon

Last year, I wrote about arriving at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon only to find the whole thing filled with smoke (see The Grand Canyon On Fire!). Now, if that had been my first view of the world’s most famous ‘hole in the ground’, as a friend of mine once called it, I might have been disappointed. Luckily I’d been there before and so could enjoy this rare occurrence.

Looking south from Bright Angel Point on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon

Looking south from Bright Angel Point on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon

My first views of the Grand Canyon had been from the South Rim 18 months earlier, and the vistas had been nothing short of spectacular! We started at Desert View and headed west along Desert View Drive, stopping at absolutely every viewpoint along the way to the National Park’s Visitor Centre. I don’t think any of us could grasp the scale of what we were looking down upon, and the storm brewing across the chasm only added to our awe.

Desert View Tower on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon

Desert View Tower on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon

Taking in the view with some pals

Taking in the view with some pals

The scale is just immense

The scale is just immense

IMG_4722

There's a storm brewing

There’s a storm brewing

IMG_4733IMG_4749The next morning, after spending the night in the Route 66 Motel, we continued west on the celebrated highway that bears the same name. IMG_4755At Peach Springs, however, we decided, What the Heck! and turned off toward the Grand Canyon West, part of the Hualapai Nation. It was quite a trek out there, especially since the last 10 or so miles were yet to be paved at that time (I understand that’s no longer the case). But at the end of the drive, the Grand Canyon Skywalk awaited us.

Me and Sue on the Grand Canyon Skywalk... Now to get the scale of this view, pull back...

Me and Sue on the Grand Canyon Skywalk…
Now to get the scale of this view, pull back…

...A bit further...

…A bit further…

...Keep going...

…Keep going…

... And that's the Grand Canyon Skywalk!

… And that’s the Grand Canyon Skywalk!

Admittedly, we were a bit surprised by the price of the Skywalk. That said, it is an amazing and unique experience…The glass-floored, U-shaped bridge extends 70 feet out over the edge of the canyon. Looking straight down is a drop of 500 feet, but lift your gaze towards the Colorado River at the very bottom of the main canyon, a mile or so away, and that drop becomes 4000 feet!

Can you see the outstretched wings of the eagle that gives Eagle Rock its name?

Can you see the outstretched wings of the eagle that gives Eagle Rock its name?

IMG_4794IMG_4795IMG_4802It takes your breath away, I can tell you!

Top of the old cable tramway at Guano Point

Top of the old cable tramway at Guano Point

Can you spot Bat Cave Mine on the far side of the Colorado River?

Can you spot Bat Cave Mine on the far side of the Colorado River?

What about now?

What about now?

This post was inspired by the themes View from Nancy (of Nancy Merrill Photography) and Scale from Michelle (of The Daily Post).

Whether or not you fancy stepping off the edge of the Grand Canyon onto a giant glass horseshoe, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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Juneau Icefield, Part II: Hiking On A Glacier

I know there are ‘travellers’ out there who think that cruise ships are for the old, the infirm and the boring. They’ve clearly never been cruising with me…

Last week, I described our helicopter ride up onto the Juneau Icefield. But this was to be no mere flight-seeing jolly. In fact, there was some serious adventuring to be done… down on the ice itself.

Our own little airport on the Hole-In-The-Wall Glacier

Our own little airport on the Hole-In-The-Wall Glacier

Our helicopter landed on the Hole-In-The-Wall Glacier, a spur of the Taku Glacier, the thickest and deepest glacier in the entire world. Northstar Trekking had already kitted us out with all the necessary equipment back at the airport, and once their guides had strapped on our crampons, it was time to head out across the ice.

Ready to go?

Ready to go?

Not yet, Sue... you have to have your crampons fitted first

Not yet, Sue… you have to have your crampons fitted first

A final safety briefing

A final safety briefing

I say ‘our crampons’, although crampons are some of the many things not made in my size. To be fair, for those of you who aren’t aware, I am only 3½ inches tall! Thankfully, Rich and Sue were happy to act as pack mules for me and my fellow Ses, as usual.

Downstream the Hole-In-The-Wall was quite flat (beside our landing site, at least)

Downstream the Hole-In-The-Wall was quite flat (beside our landing site, at least)

Upstream the ice-terrain was much rougher... Can you guess which way we went?!

Upstream the ice-terrain was much rougher… Can you guess which way we went?!

A meltwater stream flowing across the glacier's surface

A meltwater stream flowing across the glacier’s surface

And a meltwater pond, too

And a meltwater pond, too

Say 'Cheese'(y)

Say ‘Cheese'(y)

We spent an exhilarating couple of hours hiking across the glacier in a loop that eventually brought us back to our helicopter. Along the way ‘we’ climbed steep slopes using ‘our’ crampons, crossed ice-covered crevasses and stared down deep, well-like moulins. We even got to taste some of the meltwater flowing across the glacier surface.

IMG_4791IMG_4792IMG_4803

Looks boring, huh? I think not!

Looks boring, huh? I think not!

Mind the gap!

Mind the gap!

It gives me goosebumps just thinking about it!

It gives me goosebumps just thinking about it!

What's down there?

What’s down there?

Oh, it's a moulin

Oh, it’s a moulin

Sue's feeling a bit parched after all the exertion

Sue’s feeling a bit parched after all the exertion

Now that's re(fresh)ing!

Now that’s re(fresh)ing!

Looking down this moulin required a safety rope!

Looking down this moulin required a safety rope!

Lean out carefully...

Lean out carefully…

And stare down a moulin's throat

And stare down a moulin’s throat

And at the end of our hike, we still could still look forward to the helicopter flight back, not to mention an afternoon exploring Juneau. It certainly was a day I’ll always remember!

Our steeds await

Our steeds await

Group photo!

Group photo!

Our ride back to Juneau

Our ride back to Juneau

This post was inspired by this week’s Cee’s Which Way Challenge.

If hiking across an Alaskan glacier is the sort of thing you have on your Bucket List, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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