Remember, Remember, The Fifth Of November

Remember, remember, the Fifth of November,

The Gunpowder Treason and Plot,

I know of no reason

Why Gunpowder Treason

Should ever be forgot.

Barrels about to roll on Cliffe High Street, Lewes

Barrels about to roll on Cliffe High Street, Lewes

Last Thursday was Halloween. In North America, where I now live, it’s a huge deal. But in Britain, where parts of Halloween actually originated, it’s completely overshadowed by another celebration: Bonfire Night, or Guy Fawkes Night.

Here come the crosses...

Here come the crosses…

The short  version of the story behind Bonfire Night goes something like this… In 1605, a group of men plotted to assassinate King James during the Opening of Parliament on November 5th, by blowing up the House of Lords in London. But the plan was foiled when, at midnight on November 4th, 36 barrels of gunpowder  were discovered in the cellars beneath Parliament, along with the man in charge of them, Guy Fawkes. Things went from bad to worse for poor old Guy, when he and seven of his surviving conspirators were sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered, a particularly gruesome method of execution.

...There go the crosses

…There go the crosses

Over four centuries later, the towns and countryside of Britain are set alight on November 5th, in memory of what nearly happened. Despite traditionally miserable weather, the night sky is filled with fireworks and the entire country is dotted by bonfires. And on top of each bonfire is placed a man made of old clothes stuffed with paper and straw: the Guy.

A barrel built for two

A barrel built for two

Many people have their own small bonfire parties in their back gardens, but a lot more go to bigger organised events. Unfortunately, these have been a bit dampened over the last few years by the wave of (some might say) over-the-top safety regulations in which the western world is drowning. But there’s one celebration that remains unspoilt.

Perhaps these people need to get a dog

Perhaps these people need to get a dog

In Lewes, East Sussex, in the south of England, Bonfire Night is taken very seriously. Not only does it commemorate the events of 1605, but also 17 martyrs burnt at the stake in the town fifty years before.

This one's in a hurry

This one’s in a hurry

On November 5th, six of Lewes’s seven Bonfire Societies march through the town (joined by those from surrounding areas), complete with burning crosses and torches, barrels full of fire, and various effigies, including Guy Fawkes. The night culminates with five massive bonfires (upon which the effigies are burnt) and immense firework displays.

Here comes Guy (note the abandoned but still burning torches in the gutter)

Here comes Guy (note the abandoned but still burning torches in the gutter)

As many as 3000 Bonfire Society members and 80,000 spectators have been known to attend the festivities in Lewes. The slightly grainy photos in this blog are from 2008, when I was lucky enough to join them. Thanks to the sight of Bonfire Society members, dressed in their particular society’s costume, racing through the streets of the old town with barrels of fire at their heels, I will definitely remember, remember, the fifth of November.

More abandoned torches!

More abandoned torches!

The massed procession heads down School Hill

The massed procession heads down School Hill

Blazing crosses in Lewes

Blazing crosses in Lewes

Advertisements

About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
This entry was posted in Adventure, Europe, History, Jaspa's Journey, Photography, Travel, United Kingdom and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Remember, Remember, The Fifth Of November

  1. Amy says:

    Stunning shots! Thanks for the background information and history!

I'd love to hear what you've got to say!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s