Islands of the Venetian Lagoon

It’s hard to believe that yesterday morning I was 7000 kilometres (4300 miles) away, discovering some of the lesser-seen parts of the Doge’s Palace in Venice, and this morning I’m sitting at my computer at home writing my blog as usual. What a difference a day makes, as they say.

Yesterday morning, outside the Doge's Palace

Yesterday morning, outside the Doge’s Palace

Although it was my third (and Rich’s sixth) visit to Italy’s slightly-scruffy masterpiece of canals and bridges, I never get tired of exploring its labyrinth of alleyways and ‘Campos’. Of all the cities I’ve ever visited, Venice is without doubt my favourite.

Looking down on Venice's main waterfront, the Riva Degli Schiavoni, beside St Mark's Square

Looking down on Venice’s main waterfront, the Riva Degli Schiavoni, beside St Mark’s Square

Yet sometimes it’s nice to escape the hordes of other visitors (especially at this time of year) and head out into the lagoon, to sample some of its other islands. Being so close to Venice, the glassmakers’ island of Murano is by far the most popular, and can be almost as busy as Venice itself.

Murano is quiet in the evening, but can be very busy on a summer's afternoon

Murano is quiet in the evening, but can be very busy on a summer’s afternoon

Between Murano and Venice is the peaceful cemetery island of San Michele.

View of San Michele from Fondamente Nuove, Venice

View of San Michele from Fondamente Nuove, Venice

Most remote is the semi-deserted Torcello, with its beautiful cathedral.

Torcello, as seen from neighbouring Burano

Torcello, as seen from neighbouring Burano

But my personal favourite of the Venetian Lagoon’s outlying islands is Burano. Forty minutes from the closest Vaporetto (Venice’s main waterbus service) stop in Venice, and only five minutes from Torcello, it’s distant enough to deter the worst of the crowds. And although Burano can still be quite busy, it’s certainly more sedate than Murano, let alone Venice.

Mid-afternoon on Burano's main 'street'

Mid-afternoon on Burano’s main ‘street’

Its brightly-painted houses give Burano a unique and endearing charm. The vying colours of its buildings providing a texture matched only by the lace for which the island is famous.

Looking the other way

Looking the other way

A typical back alley on Burano

A typical back alley on Burano

The park beside the Vaporetto stop in Burano

The park beside the Vaporetto stop in Burano

The tower of Burano's San Martino church could give Pisa a run for its money

The tower of Burano’s San Martino church could give Pisa a run for its money

Rich's Mum in a lace maker's shop on Burano (2003)

Rich’s Mum in a lace maker’s shop on Burano (2003)

This post is partially inspired by the themes Endearing (from Ailsa’s of Where’s My Backpack?) and Texture (from Natalia of the Daily Post).

While you’re enjoying the colours of Burano, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal, or through my websiteFacebook, Twitter and Instagram?

And if that’s not enough for you, there are now three Jaspa’s Journey novels to enjoy as ebooks! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
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7 Responses to Islands of the Venetian Lagoon

  1. Italy is a worthy photography muse! Great post!

  2. Rob Weir says:

    Thanks for the post. For someone who has only been to Venice on a tour it points out the possibilities when taking an independent approach.

  3. Lorik says:

    Ahh..more of the beautiful Venice. It is time I visited Venice again…the last..and only time…was in 1977!

  4. Pingback: Liebster Award | Jaspa's Journal

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