Exploring Lima’s Historic Centre On Foot

The Historic Centre of Lima was the second of three UNESCO World Heritage Sites I visited while in Peru in April. And I didn’t even make it to Machu Picchu! The other two were the Nazca Lines (also spelled Nasca) and the Chan Chan Archaeological Zone (post coming soon).

Our wonderful guide, Vanessa Vasquez, began our tour of central Lima in the impressive Plaza San Martin.

Plaza San Martin

Plaza San Martin

The streets of this part of Lima are quite a contrast to the modern districts of San Isidro or Miraflores. Lined with colonial (and neo-colonial) buildings, they provide a rich impression of the city’s Spanish past.

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The ornate entrance to the church of La Merced

The ornate entrance to the church of La Merced

Contrast between the busy façade and relatively simple bell tower of La Merced

Contrast between the busy façade and relatively simple bell tower of La Merced

Many of the streets in the historic district are pedestrianised, so you don’t have to risk getting run over when you pause to take a closer look.

IMGP0119IMGP0171IMGP0169I particularly loved the impressive doorways/gateways opening onto concealed private courtyards away from the noise and bustle of the streets.

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This gate still opens onto the original courtyard...

This gate still opens onto the original courtyard…

...Which is now home to a high-end store, although the original architecture is still preserved behind all the banners and signs

…Which is now home to a high-end store, although the original architecture is still preserved behind all the banners and signs

But my favourite features were definitely the enclosed balconies that once allowed Lima’s richer folk to look out over the comings and goings of the city while retaining their privacy.

IMGP0165IMGP0134Of course, the regal Plaza Mayor was the architectural highlight of our tour of Lima’s Historic Centre, surrounded as it is by one magnificent building after another. Not to mention the spacious beauty of the plaza itself.

Looking across the Plaza Mayor

Looking across the Plaza Mayor

Lima Cathedral

Lima Cathedral

The Archbishop's Palace

The Archbishop’s Palace

Despite its relatively plain appearance, the Casa del Oidor is actually the oldest building on the Plaza Mayor, and was once the seat of The Royal Audience, part of the justice system during colonial times

Despite its relatively plain appearance, the Casa del Oidor is actually the oldest building on the Plaza Mayor, and was once the seat of The Royal Audience, part of the justice system during colonial times

The Government Palace

The Government Palace

Lima's City Hall

Lima’s City Hall

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Lima Cathedral and the Archbishop's Palace across Plaza Mayor

Lima Cathedral and the Archbishop’s Palace across Plaza Mayor

The fountain in the centre of Plaza Mayor

The fountain in the centre of Plaza Mayor

Our time in the Historic Centre concluded with a visit to the Convent of San Francisco. For most people, it’s the bone-filled catacombs beneath the main church that generally have the most lasting impression. And I’m no exception. Sadly, we don’t have any photos, since Rich respected the convent’s request not to take any in the catacombs, but a quick Google search will show you what I mean.

Convent and Church of San Francisco

Convent and Church of San Francisco

The interior of the church of San Francisco

The interior of the church of San Francisco

This post was inspired by Cee’s Which Way Challenge and Jo’s Monday walk.

If you’re the sort of person that loves exploring historic, faraway places, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, the first three Jaspa’s Journey novels will soon be available to enjoy, both as ebooks and in paperback! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

 

 

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
This entry was posted in History, Jaspa's Journey, Photography, South America, Travel, UNESCO World Heritage Site and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Exploring Lima’s Historic Centre On Foot

  1. restlessjo says:

    Very Spanish, Jaspa! But then, it would be, wouldn’t it? In Huelva, Andalucia, there are streets lined with those enclosed balconies, and I’ve seen them in the Canary Islands too. Those Spaniards got about 🙂 Wish I could get a bit further 🙂 Many thanks for sharing!

  2. Cee Neuner says:

    Looks like a nice place to travel and take photos. Thanks for playing 😀

  3. Pingback: Jo’s Monday walk : On the Waterfront, Bristol | restlessjo

  4. Jackie says:

    Peru is on my bucket list, like you I need a bigger bucket.

  5. Very interesting photos of Lima. It’s fascinating to note how we all take photos of different things when we visit the same places. 🙂

  6. Pingback: The Artisans of Lurín, Peru | Jaspa's Journal

  7. Pingback: Trujillo’s Colonial Heart, Peru | Jaspa's Journal

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