The Leaning Tower of Pisa

The simple fact that the Leaning Tower of Pisa still stands is a victory; a testament to modern engineering… and the stubbornness of the people of Pisa.

The Leaning Tower of Pisa in 2010

The Leaning Tower of Pisa in 2010

What we today call the Leaning Tower is actually the Campanile, or bell tower, of Pisa’s Duomo (Cathedral). It is one of four major buildings on the Piazza del Duomo, the others being the Duomo itself, the Baptistry and the Camposanto. Although Piazza del Duomo might be the official name, most people know it by the more romantic name of Piazza Dei Miracoli, the Field of Miracles.

Pisa's Piazza Dei Miracoli From left to right: the Baptistry, the Duomo and the Campanile, with the wall of the Camposanto visible in the background on the left

Pisa’s Piazza Dei Miracoli
From left to right: the Baptistry, the Duomo and the Campanile, with the wall of the Camposanto visible in the background on the left

The Duomo and its Campanile

The Duomo and its Campanile

Construction on the Campanile began in 1173, but was halted five years later, with only three storeys completed, thanks to the fact the structure was already starting to tip, as a result of foundations that were too shallow and underlying sediments that were too soft.

At least I didn't succumb to the temptation of taking a photo holding up the tower!

At least I didn’t succumb to the temptation of taking a photo holding up the tower!

It was almost a hundred years before building work recommenced in 1272. This second construction phase lasted just 6 years, before political unrest once again halted the Tower’s rise, which had at this point reached its 7th tier. A few years later, in 1298, the first official Commission into the Tower’s tilt was convened.

IMG_2317Around 1350, plans were made to finally place a belfry on top of the Tower – after all, that was the point of the whole endeavour in the first place. And in 1370, almost two centuries after construction first began, the Campanile was finally formally completed… already with a lean of 4.5 feet from the vertical.

IMG_2321Over the next six centuries, the Tower’s lean continued to increase, often accelerated by various projects aimed at doing just the opposite. In 1817, the lean was measured at over 12.5 feet.

The scaffolding really emphasises the tilt of the Campanile's entrance

The scaffolding really emphasises the tilt of the Campanile’s entrance

The Piazza del Duomo, and the historic buildings within it, was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1987.

The tower itself is hollow, with the staircase built inside the outer wall

The tower itself is hollow, with the staircase built inside the outer wall

In 1990, following the collapse of Parvia’s medieval Civic Tower the previous year, the Italian government stepped in, closed Pisa’s Campanile to the public, and set up the 17th Commission on the Leaning Tower.

One of the bells up in the belfry

One of the bells up in the belfry

By 1995, the inclination had reached an alarming 17.5 feet (OK, so the lean was pretty alarming long before this point). In fact, Pisa’s famous Leaning Tower almost collapsed during one evening of ‘Black September’ of that year, while stabilising cables were being installed.

The final few steps to the top of the belfry

The final few steps to the top of the belfry

Eventually, something had to give… and thankfully it wasn’t the Tower itself! In 1999, engineers began to very gradually extract 60 tons of sediments from beneath the foundations using giant drills. And for the first time in its history, the Campanile’s lean began to decrease.

Finally at the top!

Finally at the top!

In 2001, with its tilt now reduced to a mere 12 feet 10 inches, perhaps the biggest miracle ever to occur on the Piazza Dei Miracoli, the Leaning Tower of Pisa was reopened to the public.

Looking down on the Field of Miracles

Looking down on the Field of Miracles

View across Pisa from the top of the Leaning Tower

View across Pisa from the top of the Leaning Tower

The hills to the northeast

The hills to the northeast

This post was inspired by this week’s photo challenge of Victory from Krista of The Daily Post.

Black and White version of the image used at the top of this post... but I couldn't resist leaving the red flag!

Black and White version of the image used at the top of this post… but I couldn’t resist leaving the red flag!

If you’re the sort of person who loves delving into history on your travels, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, the first three Jaspa’s Journey novels will soon be available to enjoy, both as ebooks and in paperback! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

 

Advertisements

About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
This entry was posted in Adventure, Europe, History, Jaspa's Journey, Photography, Travel, UNESCO World Heritage Site and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to The Leaning Tower of Pisa

  1. Aian Ramos says:

    Great post! ‘Love the images, too!

  2. Anisa says:

    I visited Pisa during the time the tower was closed. I need to go back.

  3. Thanks for reminder about the LT of P. I found it quite nerve wracking walking around up top! My memory says there was nothing to stop you launching yourself off the top, but looks like that was fabrication for dramatic purposes!

  4. Sue Slaght says:

    Wonderful images. When we visited Pisa the tower was closed for renovations . A disappointment for us.

  5. Sartenada says:

    Never visited it. Thank You for these gorgeous photos.

  6. Yes it certainly is a fascinating sight to see. I’m sorry to relate that we stood for ages trying to perfect our ‘holding up the tower photo’. I was sad that the steps up to the top were closed when we were there. You had great views from high up above the town.

I'd love to hear what you've got to say!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s