Last Tango in Buenos Aires

Tango is everywhere in Buenos Aires. In some ways, you might say Tango is Buenos Aires.

We were lucky enough to find Pablo Piera to guide us around the Argentine capital. He’s passionate about Tango, in a way many Argentineans are. Almost before we’d started, we found ourselves in the tiny backroom theatre of the Cafe Tortoni, being taught the basic concepts of Tango.

Rich looks a bit uncomfortable I'm not sure if Pablo is really absorbed in the Tango, or just dismayed at Rich's dancing

Rich looks a bit uncomfortable
I’m not sure if Pablo is really absorbed in the Tango, or just dismayed at Rich’s dancing

Glenda is much more into it... And Pablo looks happier, too!

Glenda is much more into it… And Pablo looks happier, too!

A Bucket List moment for Glenda... Dancing the Tango in Buenos Aires!

A Bucket List moment for Glenda… Dancing the Tango in Buenos Aires!

In the Caminito area of the La Boca neighbourhood, Pablo explained the origins of the dance. If I remember his story correctly, Tango probably began in the early 20th Century in the less wholesome parts of Buenos Aires, created by sad and lonely immigrants separated from their wives and families. Eventually, it achieved a respectability, when the rich decided they wanted to join in. Today it seems that everywhere you go in Buenos Aires, people are dancing the Tango in the streets.

Professional dancers drumming up interest in the Caminito area

Professional dancers drumming up interest in the Caminito area

An impromptu Tango leasson

An impromptu Tango leasson

Of course, to really experience Tango, you have to go to one of the dozens of shows that are performed every night across the city. We asked Pablo to arrange a dinner show for us, something more traditional and less touristy. He suggested El Viejo Almacén in San Telmo, the oldest neighbourhood in Buenos Aires.

El Viejo Almacén during the day

El Viejo Almacén during the day

Plaques celebrating El Viejo Almacén's history and noted performers

Plaques celebrating El Viejo Almacén’s history and noted performers

I confess that beforehand I was a bit unsure about the idea of watching an entire dance show. Especially one completely in Spanish.

There was more singing than I expected

There was more singing than I expected

But I have to admit, Pablo really came up trumps. The show was amazing.

The dancers moved so fast!

The dancers moved so fast!

Moody and energetic, that's Tango

Moody and energetic, that’s Tango

I was completely captivated throughout.

Interlude for some traditional Patagonian music

Interlude for some traditional Patagonian music

The energy of the dancers was awe-inspiring.

To the right...

To the right…

To the left

To the left

And some of the moves they pulled off seemed to defy physics!

A lot of the time, you're left thinking, "How do they do that?"

A lot of the time, you’re left thinking, “How do they do that?”

Spinning!

Spinning!

And the food afterwards wasn’t half bad either!

Curtain call

Curtain call

This post was inspired by this week’s photo challenge of Dance from Ben of The Daily Post.

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
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7 Responses to Last Tango in Buenos Aires

  1. Pingback: WPC: Dance (Fly) | What's (in) the picture?

  2. Pablo Piera says:

    Rich! Fantastic pictures! Thank you for the support! (I’m the Pablo of the pictures) Warm regards for you Glenda and Jaspa!

  3. Holy cow! That’s some dancing. That would NOT be my husband and me. Not only is he left-handed, but he has two left feet with it comes to this sort of dancing. We took a ballroom dance class once but it didn’t really take and if you have nowhere to go to dance, it’s unlikely to last.

    janet

  4. mamborambo says:

    You missed the Milongas, which are the late night social dancing clubs (from midnight to 5am). That is where the true heart of Tango lies — men and women playing their games of flirtation. Well, next time perhap?

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