Pirate Capital’s Earthquake Battered Giddy House, Jamaica

In the late 17th Century, Port Royal in Jamaica was the pirate capital of the Caribbean. Which is why the British Royal Navy built Fort Charles there in 1655, in an attempt to control the turmoil of what was considered to be “the wickedest city in the World.”

Former entrance into Port Royal

Former entrance into Port Royal

In 1692, amid the chaos of the massive Jamaica Earthquake and resulting tsunami, a significant section of Port Royal was swallowed up by the sea, and much of the rest of the town was brought to ruins. In 1907, it was hit by the Kingston Earthquake, which was almost as devastating. Today the once rich and mighty city of Port Royal is little more than a village.

Main entrance to Fort Charles, Port Royal

Main entrance to Fort Charles, Port Royal

Although damaged by both earthquakes, Fort Charles still survives. During the Kingston Earthquake, one of the fort’s  Royal Artillery storehouses, built to hold gunpowder and weapons, partially sank into the shaking sand on which it was constructed.

The end wall and doorway of the Royal Artillery storehouse dips 15º to the south

The end wall and doorway of the Royal Artillery storehouse dips 15º to the south

The building came to rest at this precarious angle after the 1907 Kingston Earthquake

The building came to rest at this precarious angle after the 1907 Kingston Earthquake

Today, the building tips at an angle of around 15º. When you pass through the slanted doorway and enter the former storehouse, the tilt plays havoc with your head and balance, resulting in its nickname: the Giddy House.

Walking through the tilted entrance is a really strange sensation

Walking through the tilted entrance is a really strange sensation

And inside your balance is thrown into even more chaos

And inside your balance is thrown into even more chaos

img_6981This post was inspired by the photo themes of Entrances or Doors from Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, Traces of the Past from Paula of Lost in Translation, and Chaos from Ben of The Daily Post.

Entry to the Victoria and Albert Battery, which sank 8-10 feet into the sand of Port Royal during the 1907 earthquake

Entry to the Victoria and Albert Battery, which sank 8-10 feet into the sand of Port Royal during the 1907 earthquake

the-great-migration-coverthe-pride-of-london-coverThe first two Jaspa’s Journey adventures, The Great Migration and The Pride of London, are now available in both paperback and ebook formats! Click here for more information. The third instalment, Jaspa’s Waterloo, is scheduled to be released by Speaking Volumes early next year.

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
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10 Responses to Pirate Capital’s Earthquake Battered Giddy House, Jamaica

  1. Cee Neuner says:

    Another great post by Jaspa. Wonderful 😀

  2. Paula says:

    This is a very interesting post, Jaspa. I appreciate that you shared it with me. Fascinating stuff!

  3. Pingback: Thursday’s Special:Traces of the Past Y2-07 | Lost in Translation

  4. Pingback: Chaos: Semi Detached | What's (in) the picture?

  5. Very unusual, works well for the challenge!

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