Tower of London ‘Poppies: Wave’ At Lincoln Castle

July 17th, 1914, marked the United Kingdom’s first full day of involvement in World War One. Exactly 100 years later, the moat of the Tower of London began to gradually fill with large ceramic poppies, in an art project named Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red. By the time the installation was completed, on November 11th that year, the Tower’s moat held 888,246 poppies, one for each British or colonial military fatality in the so-called ‘War to End All Wars’.

Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red (including Weeping Window) at sunrise (picture by Jeremy Selwyn)

Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red (including Weeping Window) at sunrise
(picture by Jeremy Selwyn)

The massive undertaking was created by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper. In addition to the moat full of poppies, it included two features called Wave, which crested the bridge visitors cross to enter the castle, and Weeping Window, in which poppies seemed to pour out of the Legge’s Mount bastion.

Poppies: Wave over the bridge leading to the Byward Tower (picture by LondonMetroGirl)

Poppies: Wave over the bridge leading to the Byward Tower (picture by LondonMetroGirl)

Although my escapades in the newly released Jaspa’s Journey adventure, The Pride of London, take me to the Tower of London, sadly I didn’t get there while the poppies were in place. Thankfully though, the Wave and Weeping Window sculptures are currently doing a tour of the UK. And I was lucky enough to see Poppies: Wave at Lincoln Castle this summer.

Poppies: Wave cresting Lincoln Castle's ramparts beside the Lucy Tower

Poppies: Wave cresting Lincoln Castle’s ramparts beside the Lucy Tower

dsc_8419 dsc_8422 dsc_8426 dsc_8427 dsc_8428 dsc_8429 dsc_8430 dsc_8431Despite comprising a tiny fraction of the poppies from the full project, Poppies: Wave was still and impressive sight. And although a few people claimed the entire Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red was “prettified and toothless”, I for one found just this small part of it extremely moving.

dsc_8510dsc_8381 dsc_8373 dsc_8368dsc_8371img_6512

Panorama of Lincoln Castle from the top of the Observatory Tower - Poppies: Wave can be seen beyond the Lucy Tower on the left

Panorama of Lincoln Castle from the top of the Observatory Tower – Poppies: Wave can be seen beyond the Lucy Tower on the left

Lucy Tower and Poppies: Wave from the Observatory Tower

Lucy Tower and Poppies: Wave from the Observatory Tower

After Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red was dismantled, UK households were able to buy a poppy, with the money raised going to charity. Below are a couple of photos of me with Rich’s Mum & Dad’s poppy, to give you an idea just how big and substantial they are.

dsc_8615dsc_8617The first two Jaspa’s Journey adventures, The Great Migration and The Pride of London, are now available in both paperback and ebook formats! Click here for more information. The third instalment, Jaspa’s Waterloo, is scheduled to be released by Speaking Volumes early next year.

Jaspa’s Journey: Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

If you’re the sort of person that loves experiencing the wonders of nature and history on your travels, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
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4 Responses to Tower of London ‘Poppies: Wave’ At Lincoln Castle

  1. Anisa says:

    I saw the tower poppies and that was probably the most amazing and moving art installations I have ever seen. Nice you were able to get a poppy. I would love to see the touring exhibit.

  2. ventisqueras says:

    le guerre non avranno mai fine, perché la stupidità degli uomini non avrà mai fine
    Mille papaveri rossi ne ” la guerra di Piero” di un nostro magnifico Poeta cantautore Fabrizio De André, sono andati a rappresentare tutto l’orrore di tutte le guerre, e li ritrovo qui, in queste magnifiche immagini che ne accolgono tutto il tragico simbolismo!
    davvero molto apprezzato qusto reportage
    saluti Annalisa

    • Jaspa says:

      It says a lot that the soldiers represented by the 888,246 poppies that surrounded the Tower of London died in the so-called ‘War to End All Wars’. If only that had come true.

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