Mount St. Helens With Her Head In The Clouds

In 1980, Washington State’s Mount St. Helens erupted onto the World stage. After three months of grumbling, on May 18th she literally blew her top, in a cataclysmic explosion that sadly killed 57 people, flattened thousands of acres of mature forest and replaced the top 1300 feet of her summit with a crater 2000 feet deep.

Like so many others, a young Rich was completely taken aback by this dramatic reminder of nature’s awe-inspiring power. Right then and there he promised himself he’d one day travel to Mount St. Helens and witness the devastation for himself.

That dream final came true 33 years later.

Sort of.

As we drove up Spirit Lake Highway in May 2013, it was obvious the weather was not going to be kind. The closer we got to the mountain, the closer we also got to the base of the brooding clouds overhead. It became a question of which we’d reach first.

Mount St. Helens is up there somewhere

Mount St. Helens is up there somewhere

Finally, we arrived the visitor centre at the Johnston Ridge Observatory, which overlooks the remnants of the volcano. From there we had the most amazing view of…

A big grey blur!

IMG_4013Occasionally, the wind would shift and we’d get the briefest glimpse of the crater and the new dome growing within it.

IMG_4021But just as quickly, the clouds would fall back into place, obscuring all but the very bottom of the mountain.

Is there a hint of blue in there?

Is there a hint of blue in there?

...No, probably not!

…No, probably not!

Just to prove I was there!

Just to prove I was there!

That’s not to say our visit was a waste of time. Far from it. On the way up to (and down from) the Observatory, we did indeed witness the devastation caused by the famous eruption over three decades ago. Not to mention loads of evidence of how nature has begun healing itself in the intervening years.

Rain on Coldwater Lake

Rain on Coldwater Lake

Trees felled by the blast

Trees felled by the blast

IMG_4030

Tree trucks mixed in with the debris from the explosion, surrounded by new growth

Tree trunks mixed in with the debris from the explosion, surrounded by new growth

IMG_4032But sadly that picture-postcard panorama of Mount St. Helens’ now lop-sided peak will have to wait for another day.

One final look back towards Mount St. Helens -  Better luck next time!

One final look back towards Mount St. Helens –
Better luck next time!

This post was inspired by Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, which this week is Clouds.

Whether or not you remember the events of May 18th, 1980, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, the first three Jaspa’s Journey novels will soon be available to enjoy, both as ebooks and in paperback! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

Jaspa's Journey Logo (Bigger Bucket)

Advertisements

About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
This entry was posted in Adventure, Environment, History, Photography, Travel, USA and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Mount St. Helens With Her Head In The Clouds

  1. Fun cloud fotos. 🙂

    janet

  2. Cee Neuner says:

    I guess she has her head in the clouds. 🙂

  3. Oh yes, I was not too far away from it that day.

  4. Ruchi says:

    We visited Mt. St. Helens in May 2013 and had similar pictures with clouds and dark skies over this iconic volcano.

I'd love to hear what you've got to say!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s