Trujillo’s Colonial Heart, Peru

Most people come to Trujillo to experience the amazing ruins of Chan Chan and/or the Temples of the Sun and the Moon. But the colonial heart of the city’s historic core is equally worthy of a visitor’s attention.

One of the pedestrianised streets in Trujillo's colonial heart

One of the pedestrianised streets in Trujillo’s colonial heart

This impressive gateway once allowed horses and carriages to enter...

This impressive gateway once allowed horses and carriages to enter…

... This beautiful courtyard

… This beautiful courtyard

Trujillo was founded by Spanish conquistadors in 1534 and rapidly became the most important coastal city in Northern Peru. Today it competes with Arequipa for the title of Peru’s second largest city after Lima.

What are Sue and Lina (on the left) looking at?...

What are Sue and Lina (on the left) looking at?…

... An ornate door knocker

… An ornate door knocker

An old cannon reused to protect the corner of this wall from damage

An old cannon reused to protect the corner of this wall from damage

The buildings in the small colonial heart of Trujillo were mostly built by families grown rich on sugar cane and trading. Thankfully, good preservation and recent renovations mean that many of them retain a lot of their original character.

Iglesia La Merced (left) and Supreme Court

Iglesia La Merced (left) and Supreme Court

Plaza de Armas

Plaza de Armas

View across Plaza de Armas

View across Plaza de Armas

Personally, there were two things that particularly struck me while walking around Trujillo’s historic centre. Firstly, there were the vibrant colours, authentic to when the buildings were first constructed in colonial times. Secondly, there were all the wonderfully ornate windows, doors and entranceways.

Another stylish colonial-era door

Another stylish colonial-era door

The north side of Plaza de Armas, including the cathedral

The north side of Plaza de Armas, including the cathedral

Trujillo Cathedral

Trujillo Cathedral

Thanks to Lina of TrujilloDelPeru.Com for introducing us to Trujillo’s historic streets.

Despite the fact this door leads into what is now a bank, the building behind remains accessible to tourists (sorry the image is a little out of focus)

Despite the fact this door leads into what is now a bank, the building behind remains accessible to tourists (sorry the image is a little out of focus)

Inside are wonderful courtyards

Inside are wonderful courtyards

This original passageway

This original passageway

A waiting room

A waiting room

And even a bedroom!

And even a bedroom!

This post was inspired by Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, which this week is Doors and Windows, Jennifer’s One Word Photo Challenge, which is Artificial, and Jo’s Monday Walk.

If you’re the sort of person that loves delving into history on your travels, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

And if that’s not enough for you, the first three Jaspa’s Journey novels will soon be available to enjoy, both as ebooks and in paperback! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
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15 Responses to Trujillo’s Colonial Heart, Peru

  1. That hand door knocker looks so life-like. 😕 The cathedral is really beautiful.

  2. restlessjo says:

    It’s all wonderfully grand, isn’t it, Jaspa? And a chocolate box of a cathedral. 🙂 Thanks for the link.

  3. I especially like the door knocker!

    janet

  4. Pingback: Jo’s Monday walk : Vaqueiros | restlessjo

  5. Heyjude says:

    Definitely 10/10 for the door knocker 🙂 And what a cathedral! Looks like an OTT wedding cake.

  6. Pingback: One Word Photo Challenge: Attic | Jennifer Nichole Wells

  7. Beautiful shots. What a lovely place.

  8. vellissima says:

    I loved Trujillo and took of course too many photos. But I find the colonial cities also disturbing, representing colonialism and its necessary corollary, genocide and slavery. It is hard to celebrate unequivocally.

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