Secret Itineraries Tour, Doge’s Palace, Venice

Of all the cities I’ve ever been, Venice is my absolute favourite. Each time I go, I visit my favourite haunts, of course. But I also try to discover and experience as many new aspects of the city as possible, whether it’s a remarkable building, a surprising piece of history, or a hidden gem overlooked by most visitors.

Early morning outside the Doge's Palace

Early morning outside the Doge’s Palace

The Secret Itineraries Tour of the Doge’s Palace combines all of the above and was certainly one of the highlights of my last stay in the Queen of the Adriatic.

Entrance to the Secret Itineraries Tour

Entrance to the Secret Itineraries Tour

The Pozzi (the Wells) - the original prison in the Doge's Palace

The Pozzi (the Wells) – the original prison in the Doge’s Palace

One of the Pozzi cells

One of the Pozzi cells

Corridor in the Pozzi

Corridor in the Pozzi

Staircase leading up to the second level of the Pozzi

Staircase leading up to the second level of the Pozzi

One of the Pozzi cells, complete with original wooden cladding

One of the Pozzi cells, complete with original wooden cladding

Anyone who has been inside the Doge’s Palace will have crossed the Bridge of Sighs and entered the New Prisons. But these were just the most recent form of incarceration created by the ancient rulers of Venice. The Secret Itineraries Tour takes you behind normally closed doors to see some of their forerunners, including the infamous Piombi, up in the Palace’s attics.

Salla della Tortura (Torture Room or Chamber of Torment)

Salla della Tortura (Torture Room or Chamber of Torment)

Entrance to Casanova's original prison cell in the Piombi (The Leads) under the roof of the Doge's Palace

Entrance to Casanova’s original prison cell in the Piombi (The Leads) under the roof of the Doge’s Palace

Casanova's original prison cell

Casanova’s original prison cell

Above the Doge’s Palace’s Sala del Maggior Consiglio (Hall of the Great Council)

Above the Doge’s Palace’s Sala del Maggior Consiglio (Hall of the Great Council)

The Armoury under the roof of the Doge's Palace

The Armoury under the roof of the Doge’s Palace

Under the eaves of the Doge's Palace

Under the eaves of the Doge’s Palace

View of the Riva degli Schiavoni from an attic window of the Doge's Palace

View of the Riva degli Schiavoni from an attic window of the Doge’s Palace

Corridor in the Piombi

Corridor in the Piombi

Cell door in the Piombi

Cell door in the Piombi

Casanova's second prison cell, up in the Piombi

Casanova’s second prison cell, up in the Piombi

The Secret Itineraries Tour also takes you to several other rooms that lay behind-the-scenes of the Venetian Republic – both literally and it terms of where the power was – and remain off limits to most visitors even today.

One of the unassuming offices that once helped control the Venetian Republic

One of the unassuming offices that once helped control the Venetian Republic

Office of the Cancelliere Grande (Grand Chancellor)

Office of the Cancelliere Grande (Grand Chancellor)

Salla della Cancelleria Segreta (Chamber of the Secret Chancellery)

Salla della Cancelleria Segreta (Chamber of the Secret Chancellery)

Each member of the Cancelleria Segreta had their own cabinet...

Each member of the Cancelleria Segreta had their own cabinet…

... Which were a bit like a forerunner of a school locker!

… Which were a bit like a forerunner of a school locker!

Looking back up the Salla della Cancelleria Segreta

Looking back up the Salla della Cancelleria Segreta

This post was inspired by Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, which is Doors and Windows for a secomd week running, and Jennifer’s One Word Photo Challenge, which this week is Attic, and Jo’s Monday Walk.

Sala dei Tre Capi ('Room of the Three Heads’) - Judges of the Venetian Republic

Sala dei Tre Capi (‘Room of the Three Heads’) – Judges of the Venetian Republic

A far cry from the Pozzi or the Piombi

A far cry from the Pozzi or the Piombi

Sala degli Inquisitori Stato (State Inquisitors Room)

Sala degli Inquisitori Stato (State Inquisitors Room)

The reverse side of what is a secret door from the Sala della Bussola

The reverse side of what is a secret door from the Sala della Bussola

If you’re the sort of person that loves a bit of fun and history on your travels, why not sign up and follow my continuing Journeys here at Jaspa’s Journal (on WordPress or Bloglovin’), or through my website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr?

Back in the more public parts of the Doge's Palace

Back in the more public parts of the Doge’s Palace

And if that’s not enough for you, the first three Jaspa’s Journey novels will soon be available to enjoy, both as ebooks and in paperback! Perfect for Kids 8 – 80!

Jaspa's Journey Logo (Bigger Bucket)

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About Jaspa

Star of my own award-winning adventure novels, Jaspa's Journey. Geocaching addict & F1 fan. Adventure Journeyer & blogger extraordinaire. Check out my website: www.jaspasjourney.com And don’t forget to download the books and see what the buzz is all about!
This entry was posted in Adventure, Europe, History, Travel, UNESCO World Heritage Site and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Secret Itineraries Tour, Doge’s Palace, Venice

  1. Cee Neuner says:

    Beautiful entry for this week’s doors and windows. Happy Holidays.

  2. thegenserts says:

    My husband loves Venice, and I am so excited to finally be going with him this year! I think we will definitely be putting this tour on the agenda. Thanks for sharing!

  3. restlessjo says:

    I was thinking it a bit grim at the outset, Jaspa, but it definitely picked up 🙂 Thanks for your company this year. We’ve been to some great places together 🙂 Have a wonderful Christmas and my very best wishes for 2016.

  4. So stunning. I love Italy. I’ve only been once, but the tour of the Doge’s palace was delightful. Thank you for sharing these wonderful shots.

  5. Neha Jain says:

    The pictures of the Pozzi even today are a haunting reminder of the darkness they carried. I feel bad for the inmates who must have lived there. What a dark, dreary place…reminiscent of hell! Thank you for sharing and congratulations on getting your e-books out!

  6. Pingback: Jo’s Monday walk : Salt marshes at Fuseta | restlessjo

  7. Sue says:

    Wow, this looks fascinating – thanks for the heads-up, Jaspa! Best wishes for 2016

  8. Pingback: One Word Photo Challenge: Automatic | Jennifer Nichole Wells

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